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Multimedia

Our community is chinche- and Chagas-free: United against chinches!
These two posters (in Spanish) are directed at children and families in a public-education campaign in El Salvador to teach people how to identify and avoid chinches, the "assassin bugs" that transmit Chagas disease.(25/Aug/2008)
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en español     HTML(3k)  

Leishmaniasis Photo Gallery: Affected Persons and Risk Areas
This page contains 15 photos of persons afflicted by with various forms of leishmaniasis, a neglected tropical disease affecting the poor in rural and marginal urban areas, and the places where they live that help propogate infection.(23/Aug/2007)
In English       HTML(7.21k)  
en español     HTML(7.72k)  

Leishmaniasis Photo Gallery: Vector, Reservoirs, Parasite
This page offers a dozen photos on leishmaniasis: its vector, the phlebotomine sandfly; the domestic and wild animals that act as reservoirs; and the Leishmania parasite.(16/Jul/2007)
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en español     HTML(6.24k)  

Photo Gallery: Meeting of National Directors of Epidemiology and Malaria Programs (San José, Costa Rica, 7–10 November 2005)
The five photographs on this page illustrate the activities of the meeting, attended by representatives from 21 endemic countries, PAHO and WHO.(10/Nov/2005)
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en español     HTML(3.71k)  

Photos from El Salvador: Preparations for the Five-Year Plan to Stop Chagas Disease, 2005
The year 2005 is strategically significant for Central America, in that it is close to the end of 2010, the deadline for compliance with the goal of interrupting transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi. El Salvador is one of the countries working towards meeting the regional goal and thus preserving the health of its people. The country is in the process of concluding preparations for its Five-Year Plan for Chagas Control: 2006–2010.(26/Jul/2005)
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en español     HTML(6.52k)  

Field Photos: 2002 Mission to Guatemala to Fight Chagas Disease
The 13 photographs below illustrate the official mission to Guatemala in February 2002, conducted jointly by PAHO and the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) as part of their joint collaboration project with the Ministry of Public Health and Social Assistance (MSPAS) in the fight against Chagas disease in poverty-stricken rural communities. The mission conducted field visits to isolated communities in Zacapa, Jutiapa, Chiquimula and elsewhere to evaluate the situation with a view to present and future community-level activities and then presented its findings to the Ministry of Health in Guatemala City. All this was carried out within the framework of the Initiative of Central American Countries against Chagas Disease (IPCA).(29/Jun/2005)
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en español     HTML(9.77k)  

Field Photos: PAHO-JICA Team at Work in Guatemala
These nine photographs illustrate the teamwork going on as part of PAHO's joint collaboration project with the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) and the Ministry of Public Health and Social Assistance (MSPAS) of Guatemala in the fight against Chagas disease in poverty-stricken rural communities. These actities were carried out within the framework of the Initiative of Central American Countries against Chagas Disease (IPCA).(28/Jun/2005)
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en español     HTML(7.32k)  

Field Photos: 2005 Missions to Guatemala in Continuing Fight against Chagas Disease
These 11 photographs illustrate PAHO's 2005 official mission to Guatemala from 23–27 May 2005, as well as the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA's) project evaluation mission from 23 May to 3 June 2005, as part of their collaboration with the Ministry of Health in the fight against Chagas disease in poverty-stricken rural communities. The missions conducted field visits to Jutiapa, Jalapa, and Zacapa to evaluate community-level activities and reported the findings to the Ministry of Health in Guatemala City.(27/Jun/2005)
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en español     HTML(8.08k)  

Field Photos: Guatemalan Anti-Chinche Campaign through Community-Based Integrated Vector Control (IVM)
These 15 photos show the activities of the campaign for integrated vector control (IVM) in the fight against Chagas in Guatemala. Not only does this mean applying pesticides but also promoting community participation through education to enable them to better protect themselves. This campaign is the result of collaboration between the Ministry of Health, PAHO, and the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA).(23/Jun/2005)
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en español     HTML(9.03k)  

Field Photos: Blood-Testing among the Rural Population in Guatemala to Detect and Diagnose Chagas Disease
These ten photographs show the community-based activities of the IPCA initiative for the prevention and control of Chagas disease in Central America. IPCA is a collaborative product of the Ministries of Health, PAHO, the the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA).(26/May/2005)
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en español     HTML(6.34k)  

Field Photos, El Salvador: PAHO-MSPAS-JICA Collaboration Project to Fight Chagas Disease
These eight photographs illustrate a public-education program in schools, a TV campaign, and a medical entomology course, all activities of the collaboration agreement between PAHO and the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), within the framework of the Initiative of Central American Countries to Interrupt Vectoral and Trasfusional Transmission of Chagas Disease (IPCA).(6/Mar/2005)
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en español     HTML(5.34k)  

Field Photos, Honduras: PAHO-SSA-JICA Collaboration Project to Fight Chagas Disease
These 11 photos illustrate the activities of the collaboration agreement between PAHO and the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), within the framework of the Initiative of Central American Countries to Interrupt Vectoral and Trasfusional Transmission of Chagas Disease (IPCA). Also involved in the project is the Canadian International Development Agency and Japan Overseas Volunteers (JOVs).(5/Mar/2005)
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en español     HTML(6.68k)  

Field Photos, Guatemala: PAHO-MSPAS-JICA Collaboration Project to Fight Chagas Disease
These 11 photos demonstrate the activities carried out by the joint project between PAHO, the Ministry of Public Health and Social Assistance (MSPAS) of Guatemala, and the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), within the framework of the Initiative of Central American Countries (IPCA) against Chagas disease.(4/Mar/2005)
In English       HTML(5.66k)  
en español     HTML(6.08k)  

¡Se buscan chinches picudas! porque transmiten la Enfermedad de Chagas
Esta tarjeta, del tamaño de una tarjeta postal, informa al pública de cómo identificar los vectores de la Enfermedad de Chagas (tripanosomiasis americana) y cómo capturar los chinches y llevarlos para que se los examinen, todo en lengua sencilla y fácil de entender apropriado para fines de distribución masiva.(20/Dec/2004)
en español     HTML(3.17k)  

Número de Casos de FAS por S.E., 2002-2004
Esta diapositiva muestra en forma gráfica el número de casos de fiebre amarilla selvática (FAS) en la Región entre 2002 y 2004, por semana epidemiológica (SE), en Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Perú y Venezuela.(14/Dec/2004)
en español     PDF(143.9k)  

Rhodnius pallescens, Vector for American Trypanosomiasis (Chagas Disease) en Central America
The following photographs depict R. pallescens, or chinche in common language, one of the main vectors involved in transmitted American Trypanosomiasis (Chagas Disease) in part of Central America (Panama) and in the northern part of South America. The insect hides in the walls and thatched roofs of humble dwellings, biting the people living there and thereby infecting them with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi.(13/Nov/2003)
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en español     HTML(4.39k)  

Humble Rural Housing at Risk of Chagas Disease, Central America
The following photographs depict the type of poor rural housing that perpetuates the propagation of vectors of the Triatominae family (chinches). The contaminated feces of these insects is the cause of Trypanosoma cruzi infection when they feed upon humans, and the cause of American Trypanosomiasis (Chagas Disease). These insects hide in the walls and thatched roofs of humble dwellings of substandard quality or in adjacent structures, thus putting the occupants at risk.(13/Nov/2003)
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en español     HTML(5.15k)  

The Vector Triatoma infestans and the Parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, Responsible for Chagas Disease in the Southern Cone
These photographs depict the main Chagas vector for the Southern Cone countries, T. infestans (in colloquial Spanish, vinchuca or chupón), responsible for household and local transmission of T. cruzi, the parasite that causes Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis).(12/Nov/2003)
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en español     HTML(4.25k)  

Victims of Household Infestation: Chagas Disease in Central America
These photos depict victims of American Trypanosomiasis (Chagas Disease), an illness transmitted by vectors from the Rhodnii or Triatomae family that hide in the walls and thatched roofs of substandard housing and surrounding areas.(12/Nov/2003)
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en español     HTML(4.37k)  

Lifecycle of Triatoma dimidiata and Rhodnius prolixus, Vectors Transmitting American Trypanosomiasis (Chagas Disease) in Central America
This photograph depicts the lifecycle of two of the main vectors for American Trypanosomiasis (Chagas Disease) in Central America, , T. dimidiata and R. prolixus (chinches), insects that hide in the walls and thatched roofs of poor substandard housing and adjacent structures and transmit the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi upon biting the human occupants.(12/Nov/2003)
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en español     HTML(3.71k)  

Triatoma dimidiata, Main Vector for American Trypanosomiasis (Chagas Disease) in Central America
These photographs depict the main vector for American Trypanosomiasis (Chagas Disease), T. dimidiata (chinche), native to the Central American subregion. These insects hide in the walls and thatched roofs of humble dwellings, biting the people living there and thereby infecting them with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi.(12/Nov/2003)
In English       HTML(4.36k)  
en español     HTML(4.44k)  

Rhodnius prolixus, Vector for American Trypanosomiasis (Chagas Disease) in Central America
These photographs depict R. prolixus, or chinche in common language, one of the main vectors involved in the transmission of American Trypanosomiasis (Chagas Disease) in Central America and the northern part of South America. These insects hide in the walls and thatched roofs of humble dwellings, biting the people living there and thereby infecting them with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi.(12/Nov/2003)
In English       HTML(4.18k)  
en español     HTML(4.31k)  

Integrated Strategy for Dengue Prevention and Control
This 16-slide PowerPoint presentation unveils PAHO's new integrated strategy for approaching dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), both an emerging menace to public health in the Region. It was presented at the 44th PAHO Directing Council in September 2003 and is related to Resolution CD44r9 passed on this occasion.(25/Sep/2003)
In English       PowerPoint  
en español     PowerPoint  
em Português PowerPoint  

Maps Indicating Geographical Distribution of Chagas Vectors in Latin America--Triatoma dimidiata, Rhodnius prolixus, Triatoma infestans--with Photos
These three slides show the extent of geographical infestation of each of the trio of Chagas vectors in the Region of the Americas. They also contain a photograph of Triatoma dimidiata, Rhodnius prolixus, and Triatoma infestans, respectively.(30/Jan/2003)
In English       PowerPoint  
en español     PowerPoint  

Chagas in the Americas: Geoepidemiological Spaces for Surveillance and Control--A Series of Four Maps
This PDF copy of a PowerPoint presentation contains four maps showing the geographical distribution of Chagas disease and T. infestans infestation in the Americas. (2090 KB)(23/Jul/2002)
In English       PDF(1767.43k)  
en español     PDF(1781.22k)